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I have a .NET domain that expired 42 days ago. Only today the DNS service for my domain was shut down and i realized that the domain was going to expire.

The domain was sold and it seems i can't get it back.

Anything i can do?


That is for .COM domains. I also have a .ORG domain that is in the Redemption Period and i got it back successfully. It's everywhere in the net that the domains has a 45-days grace period and than a 30-days redintion period.

WHY godaddy takes a profit out of this and doesn't follow ICANN guidelines?

http://www.icann.org/en/resources/registrars/gtld-lifecycle

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1 Answer 1

This is from GoDaddy and what happens to domains with manual renewal set

Manual Renewal If you did not set your domain names to automatically renew, when your domain name registration expires, we proceed with the following steps before canceling it:

  • On the day after your domain name registration's expiration date, we notify you of the domain name registration's expiration and park your domain name. You can manually renew your domain name.
  • On the 5th and 12th days after expiration, we email you additional notifications. You can manually renew your domain name.
  • On the 19th day after expiration, your domain name remains on hold but becomes subject to a redemption fee. You can manually renew your domain name, subject to any applicable renewal and redemption fees.
  • On the 25th day after expiration, we put your domain name up for auction with a domain name industry auction service. You can manually renew your domain name, subject to any applicable renewal and redemption fees.
  • On the 42nd day after expiration, we cancel your domain name. We delete all services associated with the domain name.

Look up and see what day your domain was supposed to expire then see if it was sold within this time frame. If so contact GoDaddy support they are pretty helpful

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That is for .COM domains. I also have a .ORG domain that is in the Redemption Period and i got it back successfully. It's everywhere in the net that the domains has a 45-days grace period and than a 30-days redintion period. WHY godaddy takes a profit out of this and doesn't follow ICANN guidelines? icann.org/en/resources/registrars/gtld-lifecycle Godaddy did this whit the INTENDED GOAL of staling from THEIR OWN CLIENTS. –  cedivad Aug 6 '12 at 18:35
    
@cedivad No, it applies to .net, among many other TLDs. I added a source link to Anagio's answer above. Go check for yourself. Regardless of whatever you may have found elsewhere(though note that at your own link, it says 0-45 days, not always 45), you agreed to GoDaddy's terms when you signed up, not someone else's. –  Su' Aug 6 '12 at 18:38
    
Domain grace period (with DNS OFF by design) was intended for people not to lose their own domains. Godaddy did the exactly opposite, knowing to damage their own clients. In the source link it's specified that that applies for .COM, i have a .ORG registered in the same very day of the .NET and i successfully paid 100€ to have it back since that it was in its redemption period. Godaddy acts as a criminal. Point. –  cedivad Aug 6 '12 at 18:42
    
@cedivad No: "For expired .com, .net, .org, […] domain name registrations, we hold your domain name for approximately 42 days before canceling it." Sorry, but you're just wrong. If you have a problem with it, your complaint belongs with GoDaddy's support team. The faster you talk to them rather than spend time on third-party sites that can help you, the better you chances probably are. –  Su' Aug 6 '12 at 18:43
    
How was it that i had sucessufly rescued the .org domain registered the same day of the .net, in the same order, paid in the same ms of the same day? Do you want me to tell you? It's easy: go daddy didn't successfully sold in in their private auctions and thus it putted in the redemption period for me to pay to rescue it. IT'S CRIMINAL AND IT'S WANTED. –  cedivad Aug 6 '12 at 18:45

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