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Title tag different from title appearing in Google?

I have a site http://biocision.com and if you search for the phrase 'cell freezing' (broad), we used to get on the first page. However, all of a sudden the word 'cell' wasn't showing up in the title of the listing. Now it's down to the 2nd page and I don't know what the next step should be.

Here's what it looks like in google's SERP: http://screencast.com/t/ZqVme22r1MrV

Here's what the actual title of the page is: "CoolCell® Alcohol-Free Cryopreservation - BioCision :: Standardizing Samples™"

Google is displaying: CoolCell ® Freezing Containers - BioCision

Questions: 1. Does Google ever up-n-change the title of page outright? 2. Does having the title have the word "Cell" showing up twice hurt results? 3. What is the best way to get Google to re-index these pages, if that will even fix it?

There's a 99% chance i've left out important information an expert would need to help me, so i'm standing by to fill in said missing info. AMA, etc.

Other: the site is built in CMS Made Simple

Please help! Thanks in advance!

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Adding close vote, but can't hunt down the dupe right now. "Where does the search title come from" has been covered many, many times. –  Su' Jul 19 '12 at 21:29
    
If I search for cool freezing on google.com then the page you mention appears at No.7 on page 1 in the SERPS. The title and everything is as you have stated. –  w3d Jul 20 '12 at 8:33
    
Just to add, I did in fact search for cell freezing (as in your question) - I just wrote cool by mistake in my comment! I notice that it now appears at No.9 (down two) on page 1 of Google SERPS. –  w3d Jul 20 '12 at 11:54
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marked as duplicate by Su', John Conde Jul 20 '12 at 10:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1 Answer

I can see the issue (and agree with w3d, you're on page 1 pos. 7 for google.co.uk search).

When did you last change the title - maybe Google just didn't re-index yet? I assume not recently due to the Google cache as of 15th showing the same title: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Ib8_CMyMcEEJ:www.biocision.com/products/cell-freezing/coolcell/cell-cryopreservation-containers+cell+freezing&cd=7&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=uk but it can take Google a long time in some situations.

*1. Does Google ever up-n-change the title of page outright? *
I've never seen this to be the case

2. Does having the title have the word "Cell" showing up twice hurt results?
Try to avoid having it in twice.

3. What is the best way to get Google to re-index these pages, if that will even fix it?
You can change the crawl rate in webmaster tools. This may help.

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That cached page appears to have the same actual title as the page (and as stated in the question)? –  w3d Jul 20 '12 at 9:33
    
I had missed the word NOT from my reply (thanks). Updated. –  Dave Rook Jul 20 '12 at 9:45
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Did you update your question? The point is that Google's cache would appear to already have the latest version of the page... the cache and actual page have the same page title, yet the SERPS show something different. Anyway, the linked question appears to have the answer. It does not appear to be a caching issue. The page title in the SERPS simply varies according to what you search for, and this appears to be the case in this instance also. –  w3d Jul 20 '12 at 12:08
    
I didn't realize it was doing this at all (so + 1 )! Thank you. –  Dave Rook Jul 20 '12 at 12:11
    
It's not there twice for no reason. Part of it is the name of the product 'CoolCell' but you need to have "cell" as part of the title as well since google doesn't seem to get the correlation with just coolcell –  afxjzs Jul 24 '12 at 17:37
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