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Here's the scenario: lots of blogging platforms make it tedious to insert nofollow into links within the post content. I.e., you need to edit the html, format it correctly, etc.

I have a client who posts lots of content with links that should be nofollow'ed, and I thought of a novel way to handle this, since the blogging platform they're using makes it hard:

I install a URL shortener web app on the client's domain. The shortener works as normal, except it redirects via 302 instead of 301. The pagerank will therefore stay at the shortener's domain, and not flow on to the target site.

Part 2: In order to get the pagerank to collect meaningfully, say on the site's home page, the shortened URLs would be generated like this: /link?12345 instead of /link/12345. And then, the path /link would 301 to the home page. This way, the id is a param, not a path element. And thus, all the incoming shortened links are going to one path, which transfers pagerank to the home page.

So that's my idea. I wanted to see if anybody could find problems with it. Thanks!

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I'm totally missing "part 2", couild you explain better? –  Marco Demaio Jun 11 '12 at 13:29
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2 Answers

I'm not Google's alter ego Matt Cutts, but what does it make you think that because you are using /link?12345 all the PR will flow to the HOME PAGE?!

I think Google sees /link?12345 as just a different url than /link/ path so the PR won't flow to /link/ nor to HOME PAGE.

Moroever IMHO, i think your spaghetti links could punish your site as a site that is attempting to cheat the system. I know you are not doing it for black hat SEO, but how would Google know it.

I would try to fix the Blogging platform, I think it should be enough to track the function that renders the page article contents. Then using a simple PHP string subtituion or a preg_replace you could add all the needed nofollow attribute to each "<a href..." strings just before they are rendered.

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I think you may be over-complicating the solution. You could use Thaya Kareeson's nofollow.js which uses the following line to easily nofollow links:-

$(".insert-your-css-class-here a").attr("rel", "nofollow");

You can replace your css class or simply do

$("a").attr("rel", "nofollow");

Obviously you'll need to wrap the above in a function or follow the implementation tutorial linked to above.

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but are you sure that adding nofollow via Javascript would impact the PR in the same way as a nofollow written inside the HTML? I know Google reads Javascript, but are you sure Google also minds nofollow added via Javascript?! –  Marco Demaio Jun 11 '12 at 13:19
    
@MarcoDemaio you can test this very easily using the fetch as googlebot tool in Google webmaster tools. Since Matt Cutts has confirmed that the bot does execute javascript, I would suspect you'll be fine - but obviously you need to test what's happening. –  toomanyairmiles Jun 11 '12 at 18:33
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