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I know that only one H1 is recommended, but what about the other titles? I've read that you can put "as many as required H2 elements to denote sections on the page".

Is it correct?

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This of course is just down to good practise rather than standards. Generally h1 to h4, if you need more headings than that then usually you might need to think about whether your page is organised correctly.

You would then only have the amount of headings you need, there are no limits and no minimums either... whichever fits the content and keeps it neat.

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i know that only one h1 is recommended

This was never really true, just some people's opinion. That was due to people trying to game SEO: If you only have a single H1 in a document, it's important as a result of being the only one, not because it's supposed to be the only one.

And if you're using HTML5, it's really not true, with the introduction of the section element and detailed specification of the outlining algorithm. (Note: that post is a bit old; I think the article element also has the same effect. Either way, you get the idea.)

Here's Matt Cutts saying basically, "If it makes sense to have more than one, fine, just don't go nuts." Slightly interesting: that video even predates the HTML5 post.

The same logic follows down to all the other H* tags: use as many as needed to accurately represent your document and its structure.

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As Shane has said, there are no standards for such a thing. However, start doing some usability research. I posted a link to Google because, and simply put, the more research you read and learn about, the more effective you can place the h2-h4's.

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