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I heard about Joomla, Drupal, Wordpress, etc. but I don't know about their detailed features. I am looking for a content management system meeting the following requirements:

  1. Possibility to add simple text pages, with internal and external links (more or less the same features as a wiki)
  2. Possibility to add complex JavaScript content pages (i.e., the content of the page is entirely determined by JavaScript, except the page frame itself, menu, headers, footers...)
  3. Good back-up system. Something like export/import in svn.
  4. Possibility to have a good control on HTML keywords associated with each page.
  5. Multi-user, with some access control for editing
  6. Good community support.

Which framework is best suited for the above requirements? Points 2, 3 and 6 are the most important.

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To clarify the Javascript need: ideally, I would like to have access to the <div> corresponding the page content and do whatever I want under this <div> (in a reasonable way of course). –  JVerstry Jan 30 '12 at 23:55
    
Just a note on the JavaScript requirement - as Tim K points out, swapping out the body content of the page is not something these systems typically do, primarily because almost all spiders can't handle or index scripted content - so even if you're adding quality keywords to your pages, if the content is added by JS, the spiders aren't going to index it, and the keywords won't count for anything. –  Zhaph - Ben Duguid Jan 31 '12 at 14:48
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For this, I would lean towards Drupal. Let me address each of your points as best I can, realizing that we have converted our development shop from custom .NET apps to the Drupal framework because of the flexibility we like to provide to our webmasters/customers. We have used Drupal for both hosting and dyanmic internal intranets where every user can be a poster of pages/information.

Drupal Gardens can give you a quick demo of your own Drupal 7 site for free and is a good location to test a simple feature set for a site of this nature.

1 Possibility to add simple text pages, with internal and external links (more or less the same features as a wiki)

  • Drupal pages can be simple or complex. This can be done in many ways.

2 Possibility to add complex JavaScript content pages (i.e., the content of the page is entirely determined by JavaScript, except the page frame itself, menu, headers, footers...)

  • Drupal will let you insert JavaScript into a node for complex things. However, this is not normal for most sites. This requirement would be a challenge for all three CMS systems depending on what you'd like to accomplish here.

3 Good back-up system. Something like export/import in svn.

  • For Drupal, you can use SVN against the site, but you need to think differently about CMS systems. For a CMS the framework is your code, i.e. the process for displaying content. For Drupal the real data exists in MySQL, so MySQL backups are needed. Lastly, with Drupal, you can turn on revisions which will keep copies of the content of a page as it is edited.

4 Possibility to have a good control on HTML keywords associated with each page.

  • Drupal has a module with lets you manage keywords in a different fashion for pages and stories stored in the system. You can customize each page if needed. Having a module implement keyword management has been very slick for us. The module to accomplish this is called Nodewords.

5 Multi-user, with some access control for editing

  • A complete user system is built into Drupal and modules exist to further extend the security of the system. Editing can be controled and if you are familiar with CKEditor, it is one of many HTML editors that are supported in Drupal.

6 Good community support.

  • Drupal community support is great. I have been able to find plenty of information to migrate from .NET to a PHP content management platform.
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All of them do what you ask, the means vary though.

Personally I would go for Wordpress in that it has the simplest UI for users, widest support and more easily available plugins than the rest put together.

Developers, on the other hand, seem to be happier with Drupal or Joomla. I'm told in code terms it's easier for developers to extend.

If you can provide some more details about the size and number of users your project has then I might be able to be more specific.

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Few users, lots of content, contents needs to be easily accessible with queries, and easily accessible for web spiders and bots to index. –  JVerstry Jan 31 '12 at 0:06
    
The content is managed in-house. We don't plan to have external users define content. –  JVerstry Jan 31 '12 at 0:07
    
I use a wordpress plugin called ultimate SEO, which gives tons of options and advice for the SEO needy. Other than that you've said nothing that would alter my reccomendation of wordpress. Can't point out enough that this is a personal opinion! –  toomanyairmiles Jan 31 '12 at 0:19
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