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I would like to embed a content from another website (a webcam object) to my website. Can it be considered as a violation of copyright law? Both my website and the embedded are within EU. There is no copyright claim at the website I'd like to embed.

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Jan 19 '12 at 9:01

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When you say "embed", do you mean that you would upload a copy of the object/file on your web site, or simply reference the object hosted on their site? –  Jacob Hume Jan 19 '12 at 18:44
    
@JacobHume, I would just copy javascript code that creates the webcam window on page (using some DOM magic). The javascript code then references the player.swf and the IP of the webcam using the rtmp:// protocol. –  Tomas Jan 19 '12 at 19:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think it can.

Everything created is protected by copyright, even if not claimed through a visible line of text.

In your case, I should try and contact the rightful owner of the other website to ask for permission. Make sure you have this literally written down by the opposite webmaster for future reference.

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Thanks. "literally written down" - do you think email would suffice? –  Tomas Jan 19 '12 at 19:39

Not only embedding but also just linking to other content without prior explicit permission of rights holder is violation of Copyright Law.

Read, for example:

Update (Answering @Thomas's question in comment):
No, they are not not local errors.

Someone would die, either internet or copyright with author rights. They are dig-graving each another now.

I've just cited a few verdicts but they are thousands, I wrote: "google on it". You are asking easily searchable banalities, it is why nobody was answering you here

Why it is incredible? All internet, especially search engines, is based on explicit violation of Copyright Law and author rights.

Also google for "SOPA blackout", etc and understand the ever-existing de facto vs. de jure dilemma

Now, discussions (answering questions to answers) are explicit violations of this board for which my accounts were suspended here many times and still is in some of stackExchange boards.

Update2:
The more proper reference should have probably been to wiki's Desuetude:

  • "In law, desuetude (from the Latin desuetudo, outdated, no longer custom) is a doctrine that causes statutes, similar legislation or legal principles to lapse and become unenforceable by a long habit of non-enforcement or lapse of time. It is what happens to laws that are not repealed when they become obsolete. It is the legal doctrine that long and continued non-use of a law renders it invalid, at least in the sense that courts will no longer tolerate punishing its transgressors"
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Ehh? Especially the Google case is incredible! But, isn't this just a local judge failure, instead of being general law? If you had to ask for explicit permission for any link you create, the Internet would die now! –  Tomas Feb 25 '12 at 18:39
    
Updated my answer –  Gennady Vanin Novosibirsk Feb 25 '12 at 23:38

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