Take the 2-minute tour ×
Webmasters Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for pro webmasters. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have ran in to an issue with my design. It looks fine when viewing it on a monitor that isn't widescreen but once I go to a widescreen monitor the extra space is truly irritating. What should I do to take away from that feeling of unused space on the edges of the site.

Oh, and please don't critique any other aspects of the site than layout. Yes, I know there are images that are .png that should be .jpg.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by danlefree Jan 18 '12 at 23:13

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I see that this question is closed but I have to jump in and offer Media Queries. Media Queries can help you prime your design for different resolutions. A nice tutorial/example - webdesignerwall.com/tutorials/css3-media-queries –  DBUK Feb 16 '12 at 9:45

1 Answer 1

One of the great things about design is that it is artistic; there are no "absolutes" in web design. There are numerous ways to do same thing, and a lot of it is opinion and not fact.

You can try floating-width layouts with CSS (just beware text that runs all across the page - it makes it unreadable, so check min-width and max-width). You can also use advertisements (even for your own site). You can re-arrange the design to make the content more engaging. Or your could just let the white-space exist :)

Honestly, I think the latter (just ignoring it) may be the best option. Without knowing your site personally and looking at it, I cannot give you true, specific advise. For example, is the main content div of your site 700px wide? 900px? What are your color schemes? Etc... everything plays in. Everything. However, here are some interesting things to note:

  • Just because people have a wide-screen monitor does not mean their browser is full-screen.
  • people with widescreen monitors are used to seeing a lot of whitespace
  • filling whitespace can actually distract users from the content. There are a lot of minimalist designs that do very well
  • this may not affect all of your users (or maybe .

On that last point: your target audience is a huge focus of web design. Google Analytics and Piwik are free analytics tools that give you insight to your users and how your users interact with your site, including browser size. Personally, I have been beta testing GraphUX, and find it easier to use (but it won't be free).

The point is, see (a) who your users are, (b) how they use the site, and (c) how to best deliver the content. Sometimes blank space is bad, sometimes it's good.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect answer. –  Anonymous Jan 18 '12 at 10:46
    
Well, the think is it is not just white space I mean it is textures and it just happens to look awkward. Although the site is for a ski shop so I doubt many web snobs will be on meaning that most people probably won't care. –  Tom Steinbrecher Jan 18 '12 at 14:27

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.