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Lets say I am describing the text in, for example, 2100 words for the same keyword. My purpose would be to have 700 words per page. Obviously I need to have 3 pages so I can divide the text with, in average, 700 words per page.

The first page (where the text will begin) has doindex attribute, other two have noindex attribute. This way I can protect myself from getting visitors on the website in the middle of the text (second page) or at the end of the text (third page). So I can get visitors always where the text starts and that's why it is doindex.

Obviously, since its the same text but split on 3 parts due its size, I am targeting the same keyword. All 3 URLs will have either exactly the same URL or similar. What do I have to care about so I create preventive solution in advance so I'm not going to have issue with duplication or cannibalization?

What are the list of tasks I need to keep in mind? I have instinct that if I do this, it is very possible I will have duplication issue but don't want that or cannibalizaton. I already know that I should NOT use pagination but rather nofollow internal links from page1 to page2 and from page2 to page3. Anchor text of them should probably be the same - keyword which I'm targeting.

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There's no such thing as "doindex." It's the default behavior, anyway, and nothing needs to be specified for it. –  Su' Oct 23 '11 at 19:18
    
anyone knows the answer on my question? –  Andrew01 Oct 27 '11 at 20:44
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All 3 urls will have the same url? What the hell did I just read? –  patricksweeney Oct 11 '12 at 19:03

1 Answer 1

From this StackOverflow question:

You can't force Google to do anything, however, they have made it easier to deal with pagination issues with a recent post on rel="next" and rel="prev".

But the primary problem you face is signalling to Google that your first (main) page is the starting point - this is achieved using internal link and back-link "juice" focussed on that page. You need to ensure that the first page of results is linked to properly from higher-value pages (like the home-page).

and

Google recently announced that you can use View All which will allow them to find and index entire articles that are normally broken up using pagination and display them all as one result.

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Thank you for both replies but neither of them has anything to do with my question. I was asking what do I have to do so I protect myself from being "penalized" for either cannibalism and/or duplication due to the reason stated in my first post (same text on more than one page - just because its too large)? If I did some X task, the possibility of duplication / cannibalism might drastically decrease. Now Im looking for that X task what to do...? There might be something more than just 1 task. Pagination and/or internal link to first page has nothing to do with this... –  Andrew01 Oct 24 '11 at 21:18
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@Andrew01 I disagree with both your comment and the statement in your OP - "I already know that I should NOT use pagination". This is a case for pagination, and it is also not duplicate content (unless your 3 blocks of 700 words are the same)...If that's not the case then you might want to rephrase the question... –  Mike Hudson Oct 25 '11 at 3:11
    
Mike if I used pagination and if I had, in situation mentoined in my first post, some dofollow internal links on second page (second part of same text) and/or third page (third part of same text) then I cannot expect any link juice benefit. But again; pagination doesn't have anything to do with my question. About your sentence "and it is also not duplicate content". So you are saying even if I target the SAME keyword but on different page with different text and even if URL was the same (!!!), I don't need to worry about being penalized for duplication. Correct? What about cannibalism issue? –  Andrew01 Oct 25 '11 at 19:25

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