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Blogger/Blogspot recently released a new version of their software. This new version appears to have features relevant to a simple CMS (static page, albeit limited).

I read from their Buzz Blog about a few websites that don't necessarily look like a typical Blogspot blog but rather somewhat a typical website deployed using a minimal CMS software:

http://buzz.blogger.com/2011/07/you-can-do-some-amazing-things-with.html

Can anyone point resources where I can learn how to do these? (Preferably case-studies with some steps how to create such website as oppose to Blogger HOWTO).

Plus point if you can also tell me the infrastructure of Blogger.com (software stack, etc).

Thanks

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Aug 25 '11 at 12:08

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1 Answer

Why use Blogger when there are plenty of better options (also free, also easy to integrate with Google services) out there with much better support for static pages?

e.g. WordPress, Joomla, Drupal, DotNetNuke. You can compara this and more at: cmsmatrix.org

WordPress.com is the closest to Blogger/Blogspot. The self hosted version (wordpress.org) allows much more customization and works on a LAMP (recommended) or WAMP stack and just about any hosting account out there.

There's plenty of How-tos on building WP sites just a Google search away.

Blogger's software stack is really a non-issue since customization is limited to HTML/CSS and Javascript, so the stack doesn't really matter.

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WordPress.com would be a good alternative. But presumably someone who's willing to use blogger knowing that it provides only basic CMS features sees it as a fair tradeoff for the convenience of a fully maintained SaaS platform. You get less flexibility, but you also have a lot less to worry about. You don't need to pay for separate hosting or handle the installation and maintenance of the application. It's not the route I prefer, but it certainly makes sense for certain users. –  Lèse majesté Apr 12 '12 at 4:35
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protected by John Conde Nov 9 '12 at 23:50

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