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One of my visitors from my website informed me that every so often (quite rarely actually), when trying to visit my website, he gets a 416 Error: Requested Range Not Satisfiable

I've never heard of such an error, and don't see anything strange anywhere on my apache logs.

What can cause such an error?

My website is a wordpress blog, running on apache, centos.

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Jul 24 '11 at 1:05

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3 Answers 3

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This looks like a duplicate question:

416 Requested Range Not Satisfiable

check the explanation here:

http://www.addedbytes.com/for-beginners/http-status-codes/

But basically, check the error log for the 416 error [I know you said you checked - it should be there unless you are including a resource from another server] that should tell you what file - then make sure it is getting cached correctly [or not cached at all]

-sean

UPDATE:

what you can do with APC, is disable caching of certyain files by using the apc.filters setting in your php.ini [or apc.inc or however you are including the apc config] If you can figure out which file[s] are throwing the 416 error, you can start by configuring APC to not cache them. Sounds like a reasonable start to me.

AAAACtually, come to think of it, if you can find the file throwing the error, you can use APC to 1. see if it is cached & 2. check on the file size that APC thinks it is then 3. check the actual size on disk. Check out this link: devzone.zend.com/article/12618 [the official APC docs kinda suck]

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The question you linked had the server running APC. Coincidentally, my server also has APC installed. Can this be a cause? –  Virendar Jul 22 '11 at 20:00
    
what you can do with APC, is disable caching of certyain files by using the apc.filters setting in your php.ini [or apc.inc or however you are including the apc config] If you can figure out which file[s] are throwing the 416 error, you can start by configuring APC to not cache them. Sounds like a reasonable start to me. –  Sean Kimball Jul 22 '11 at 21:32
    
AAAACtually, come to think of it, if you can find the file throwing the error, you can use APC to 1. see if it is cached & 2. check on the file size that APC thinks it is then 3. check the actual size on disk. Check out this link: devzone.zend.com/article/12618 [the official APC docs kinda suck] –  Sean Kimball Jul 22 '11 at 21:37
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That error means that some client sends a request to your server which specifies a range of bytes which is not serveable due to some reason.

This can happen with something like this example:

  • You have an image with physical size 1000 bytes
  • Your Server specifies the wrong content length e.g. 1500
  • The client sends a request to get 0 - 1500 bytes from your server
  • Your server sends a 416 because the image has only 1000bytes
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Confirmed, when modifying a file while a request is served can lead to 416 errors. –  Elias Torres Arroyo Oct 18 '13 at 11:46
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416 - Requested Range Not Satisfiable
A 416 status code indicates that the server was unable to fulfill the request. This may be, for example, because the client asked for the 800th-900th bytes of a document, but the document was only 200 bytes long.

What causes this error in your case is hard to tell. I would start with the Apache error.log and scan for 416. This way you might be able to narrow it down further to what page was called and go from there.

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