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I was wondering about my domain and if next is afordable.

First of all this is my "architecture":

  • Domain registration at GoDaddy.com
  • Hosting at Dreamhost
  • mail at google apps

Until now I setted up the google apps MX entries in my domain through the GoDaddy manager, but now what I want is to set up the hosting I have hired from Dreamhost.

I understand that all I have to do is to setup next Dreamhost NS entries into the GoDaddy domain manager:

NS1.Dreamhost.COM. 66.33.206.206 NS2.Dreamhost.COM. 208.96.10.221 NS3.Dreamhost.COM. 66.33.216.216

My question is, will my mail keep working right as soon as the MX entries I already setup into the GoDaddy are the Google Apps ones?

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migrated from superuser.com Jun 29 '11 at 4:16

This question came from our site for computer enthusiasts and power users.

    
Exactly duplicates this ServerFault question. –  JdeBP Jun 29 '11 at 13:03

2 Answers 2

I would not change your DNS servers to Dreamhost...Your DNS in Google is all you need, and it is relatively easy to use.

Just add an A (host) record for www that points to the proper IP address (It may give you an error saying you need to delete the www CNAME record...you can do that and re-add the www A record). See the top areas of the screenshot.

Very simple.

enter image description here

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+1 for suggesting the removal of the CNAME record for the "www" portion of the name -- using direct A or AAAA records, without CNAME, means slightly less processing power get consumed overall. –  Randolf Richardson Jun 29 '11 at 3:51

Yes, but you MUST keep the MX records the same (and any other DNS records that Google requires).

Since you're specifying DreamHost.com DNS servers, you'll need to get the "Zone Administrator" (the name of the role for the person or people responsible for DNS server/zone management) at Dream Host to add the needed MX (and other) records to your zone (a "zone" is basically the technical term for your internet domain name for the purposes of what you currently need).

If Dream Host provides a "self serve DNS management interface" for you, then you can update the zone records on your own.

P.S.: Domain name registration is essentially transparent -- you can use whichever Registrar you please, as long as you have the correct DNS servers listed (minimum 2, maximum 13).

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And how can I keep the ns records in godaddy and the hosting into dreamhost? I don't want to use the dreamhost dns server just the hosting. –  unkown Jun 29 '11 at 3:21
    
Then don't change your DNS servers away from the Registrar to Dream Host -- just keep them where they are. All you need to do for the hosting company is use the appropriate A (IPv4) and AAAA (IPv6) records for "example.com" and "www.example.com" (assuming "example.com" is your internet domain name). Your hosting company should have no trouble indicating what these IP addresses are (and any serious hosting company these days will provide you with at least one IPv4 address, and at least one IPv6 address). –  Randolf Richardson Jun 29 '11 at 3:30
    
In my opinion, however, it makes more sense to have the DNS managed by the hosting company because Registrars are traditionally better-suited to dealing only with internet domain name registration matters. –  Randolf Richardson Jun 29 '11 at 3:32
    
@Randolf Richardson I keep all of my DNS records (at least those that are not dynamic) at Godaddy. I don't agree at all with your comment about registrars, especially big ones...it is too general. I would say go by the interface, and accessibility to support. Never go with a small company's DNS if you think you might need to make changes over the weekend...I have spent so much time getting the ONLY guy in such small companies to call me back. –  KCotreau Jun 29 '11 at 3:43
    
@KCotreau: There are many big companies that also only provide technical support during business days (or even just business hours on business days). When it comes to self-serve interfaces, then it doesn't really matter so much because the end user can make whatever changes are allowed whenever they want to. An even better way to handle this stuff is to keep your zone spread across multiple DNS servers in many different continents using different providers (be it free, paid-for, etc.). –  Randolf Richardson Jun 29 '11 at 3:48

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