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I have some premium domain names , and I have received many dispute emails, most of them from china, and I am in the middle east. They are mainly talking about Intellectual property rights regarding my domain names.

What I should do when I get these kinds of dispute emails?

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Press the delete button? ;) –  UpTheCreek Mar 10 '11 at 12:36
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

First off I am not a lawyer so contacting one that understands internet laws is always useful and don't take my advice as legal advice. A web patent lawyer might be what you need.

That being said, my company has received a number of these emails as well and we are in the US. Usually, if you Google the email address, company name, or some other piece of info about the email you will see a number of sites stating that the email is a scam. China as far as I know has little to no intellectual property laws.

Furthermore, if your domain does not have a TLD that belongs to China, I would assume a Chinese company has no legal rights whatsoever to do anything about your site name. Wikipedia has a list of all of the TLDs, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Internet_top-level_domains, China has a couple because of their numerous special districts.

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<quote>Furthermore, if your domain does not have a TLD that belongs to China...</quote> Why would a Chinese company have any fewer rights to a .com domain than a US based one? –  UpTheCreek Mar 10 '11 at 12:39
    
I guess ICANN must outline some of rules to save the rights of all domain names and company on the internet –  tawfekov Mar 10 '11 at 13:23
    
@UpTheCreek - Good point. To clarify, China controls a number of country specific TLDs. If China were to disconnect its internet from the rest of the world, after a long enough period of time all Chinese TLD sites would go down. I just meant China has more control over TLDs that are specific to its country. –  RandomBen Mar 10 '11 at 21:13
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