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I have noticed that several people find my website by searching for a completely unrelated term. This has to do with the fact that I have registered the company on Google Places with the keyword/category "webb-hotell", which in Swedish means web-hosting. If you are Swedish you may suggest using "webbhotell" instead. But the thing is that Google doesn't consider that a category, thus I get no rank at all for that keyword.

It seems like I'm getting hits from people searching hotels in my area. If I type "hotel [my location]" I get a really high rank. It's not like I want people to end up on my site if they want a hotel, but it's Google's fault. My question is: What can I do about it?

P.S: Can someone create the tag "google-places" for me?

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2 Answers 2

Presumably your pages are in Swedish? If they are, or predominantly are, you would want the appropriate html language tag. For the UK I use en-gb, for Sweden it would be sv.

I'm pretty sure Google reads these to help geo-locate domains that use domains that are not expressly used now for countries - .eu, .me, .ly (bit.ly for example)

If that has any effect be sure to post back here :)

Adrian

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I'm not sure there is anything you can do about your actual ranking for hotel, but one thing is to make sure that your title tage and meta-description is clear about what your company does. Since Google uses these as the text for your rankings, this lets users searching for hotel know that you are not a hotel.

Otherwise, focus on getting your site ranked well in your actual keywords and then hopefully that will overshadow random traffic from the wrong keyword.

I have a similar situation on my site since my company name contains a keyword for a completely different niche.

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